Classical snobs

Discussion in 'Music and Recordings' started by Claritas, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. Craigo

    Craigo MOT: Mage Audio

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    Thanks for you help. Haven't seen this version with the interview. Glad at least this put it on your radar. Easily in my top three. Groot (how awesome is that?) has a website dedicated to his recordings. Maybe it will pop up there someday.
     
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  2. wormcycle

    wormcycle Friend

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    The longest recording of the Schubert Piano Trio nr 2 e-flat Op 100 I have ever heard and the most musical and enjoyable.
    It is close to 52 mins and loved every minute of it.

    https://tidal.com/album/17466358
    [​IMG]

    Simply amazing, my next best is by Trio Wanderer
     
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  3. earnmyturns

    earnmyturns Friend

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    Can't stop listening to this recent issue. An intoxicating mix of medieval and contemporary vocal works. More details here.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. gepardcv

    gepardcv Almost "Made"

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    If you like this kind of “early music” vocals, you owe it to yourself to listen to Trio Mediaeval’s Folk Songs album from the mid-2000s.

    https://tidal.com/album/17470611
     
  5. Stuff Jones

    Stuff Jones Friend

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    Covered by his student and perhaps my favorite guitarist, Marc Ribot.

     
  6. jowls

    jowls Never shitposts (please) - Friend

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    Enjoying this new release of Bach Cello Suites transcribed for Viola by Kim Kashkashian on ECM.

     
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  7. Metro

    Metro Friend

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  8. gepardcv

    gepardcv Almost "Made"

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    Slightly off-topic, but that viola transcription album is marked "M" in Tidal and there doesn't seem to be another copy. Does that mean I need an MQA-enabled DAC to hear it properly? I do not possess such a thing, and have zero interest in buying one. How degraded will the files be on a vanilla DAC?
     
  9. Metro

    Metro Friend

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    No, you don't need an MQA-enabled DAC. Without decoding, the tracks will play at 48/24 like regular FLAC streams. If you play using the Tidal desktop app on Mac or PC and set the streaming quality to Master, it will do the 1st level decode in software and output a 96/24 stream. You can decide for yourself whether the higher res stream makes a difference.
     
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  10. wormcycle

    wormcycle Friend

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  11. Muse Wanderer

    Muse Wanderer Friend

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    String sextet number 1 is a favourite Brahms piece of mine. The first movement is full of vibrant melody that unfolds its underlying melancholy.

    The wonderful slow second movement is a delight to listen to. It is truly a hidden musical gem with a nostalgic and meandering feeling of sadness.

    The scherzo lightens the mood and the final rondo closes the piece with a Schubertian touch.

    Even Vulcans cry on hearing it!
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2018
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  12. earnmyturns

    earnmyturns Friend

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    Music for a winter morning, magical.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. zonto

    zonto Friend

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    This morning, I listened to the shortest rendition of Beethoven’s 9th symphony I’ve ever heard:

    [​IMG]

    I think it is about 80 minutes, so about 20 minutes shorter than average I think. Sometimes even the Utopias being driven by the Ragnarok had trouble keeping up. Haven’t listened to the accompanying discussion yet. The tears still flowed, however, multiple times.

    I think the Gramophone review is pretty on-point, especially about the choir drowning out the orchestra.
     
  14. Metro

    Metro Friend

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    I sampled some passages of this album on Tidal (it's also on other streaming services) and indeed the tempos are much faster than commonly performed. The times you mentioned are way off. The track timings of this performance add up to 58:24. An 80 minute performance is relatively slow and 100 minutes would be excruciating (legend is that when Sony was developing the CD format, its chairman mandated that it must be able to hold von Karajan's Beethoven 9, which is about 72 minutes).

    I'll come back to this album for a full listen, including Zander's commentary which are very interesting. I listened to two of the discussion tracks, concerning tempo and the purpose of the recording. Zander was trying to adhere as closely as possible to what is written on Beethoven's score, particularly the metronome markings which everybody tends to ignore as being unplayable, or not matching the character of the music. Zander argues that people miss some important aspects about the music when they deviate from the score,.

    How a composer intended their music to be played is a huge and controversial topic in classical music. This performance is at one extreme and certainly will not be to everybody's liking, but I think it is a valuable release that provokes thought and discussion on the subject.
     
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  15. wormcycle

    wormcycle Friend

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    After being fascinated by the sound of L'Archibudelli, I found other recordings of Anner Bylsma, a Dutch cellist I had never heard before. The tone of his cello is pretty unique, a touch darker but some of his recordings are just stunning. Like for example Schubert Arpeggione Sonata. I had never been able to fully appreciate it listening to the recording by Rostropovitch and Britten. This is one of those a bit tired performances of Rostropovitch, and Britten as a pianist is just boring comparing to Jos Immerseel. Bylsma and Immerseel make it exciting. It is very rare that both the complex structure of a composition and musical beauty is so obviously present in a single performance. I bought one of the Bylsma's boxes by Sony, ripped it with EAC and and I feel will be very busy for days.
    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Metro

    Metro Friend

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    Anner Bylsma is well known in the "historically informed performance" (HIP) movement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historically_informed_performance. The difference in sound you're hearing comes from using instruments, tuning, and tempo that is thought to be how it would have been performed when the music was composed. For example, Beethoven performed on an 1800 forte piano which sounds very different from a modern Steinway, or Bach played by small ensembles using replicas of instruments of the period rather than full modern orchestra with modern instruments.

    The HIP approach is a big discussion topic in classical music among scholars and musicians, about how music should be performed. In the 1970's and 80's the HIP movement grew in exposure with record releases. It was exciting to hear familiar works performed in a fresh and different way but there was also criticism that sometimes performances were too mechanical about how the music is "supposed" to sound. In the earlier days, HIP was a bit of a novelty but over time it become mainstream and has been a lasting influence on classical performances.
     
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  17. Muse Wanderer

    Muse Wanderer Friend

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    Getting sucked into Mozart's music big time lately. Cannot get enough of it and my 2 kids love it.

    Listening to the piano concertos at random at times trying to avoid the overly familiar. Today we had the 15th stuck on a loop. Exuberant 1st movement played by Perahia, simply heavenly second movement and start to dance like crazy third rondo (with a woodwind section that is splendid).



    Mozart's violin sonatas are addictive to say the least. These have been my weekly commute ZX2-Andros playlist this week.


    Bach's Well Tempered Clavier books 1 and 2 have been a recurrent listen since September this year. Apart from Gould, my reference for overall coherence and clarity, I am also listening to Gulda, Schiff, Richter, Tureck and Gilbert on harpsichord.

    Today I spent a few hours practicing Bach's C major prelude from book 1 of the Well Tempered Clavier on my piano. I managed to high five the ceiling when I got it all done seamlessly.


    Slowly getting there with Bach's 5th French suite Gavotte in G major. Lovely piece by the great master..
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2018
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  18. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Friend

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    If Mozart were born in our era & used the tools & compositional idioms of late 20th/early 21st century, he would be a titan, an enormous star--just as he was in his own time. The reasons would be the same:
    • Once-per-century virtuosity as a player, beginning in childhood
    • And once-per-century excellence as a composer, also beginning in childhood.
    The Classical Period during which Mozart lived and composed, valued consonance, (apparent) simplicity, and melodic beauty above all. By that time, a mere 50 years after J.S. Bach's time, complexity & contrapuntal density were thoroughly out of style. Thus, Mozart's best music has a limpid, seemingly transparent beauty & ease. Yet many of his compositions also had great inner complexity, density, innovation, even frank experimentation. Several of his string quartets dedicated to Haydn were as edgy and transgressive as anything written in that century.

    Certainly, some of his music was less than totally heartfelt (including some commissions for instruments--or people--he did not admire). But I can't recall hearing any Mozart composition, even the most minor, and not hearing that magical melodic sound at least once or twice. More often than not, his music just "sings."

    I did all my heavy listening to Mozart in my 20's & 30's, when all those K. numbers opened musical & sonic doors for me. I eventually moved on to other compositional styles that were different & intriguing (French impressionism, English "landscape" composers, modernism). Lately I'm intensely drawn to minimalism (all kinds), atonal & microtonal music, and bleeding edge choral writing.

    Still, whenever I go back to Mozart, I am instantly drawn into that beautiful, consonant, melodic music box sound of his.
     
  19. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Friend

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    OH, YEAH! Have this & play it often. Also works by many of his contemporaries.

    Are you hip to Delius?
     
  20. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Friend

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    I saw Gershwin's Concerto in F performed at Lincoln Center when I was 9 or 10. At that age I made no real distinction between his best songs (for example, anything of his sung by Ella Fitzgerald) and his orchestral works. They were all beautiful songs to me. I wish he had lived longer. I suspect his depth & attainment in "classical music" would have advanced so much w/add' years.
     

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