Classical snobs

Discussion in 'Music and Recordings' started by Claritas, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. earnmyturns

    earnmyturns Friend

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    A recent vocal favorite. Doesn't fit any neat category, think Renaissance meets contemporary improvisation. ECM house style fits it really well.

     
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  2. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    What a gem! It's made my day. Never thought I would actually see Tito Gobbi performing Rigoletto . He's always been my favorite. YouTube, thank you!
     
  3. Metro

    Metro Almost "Made"

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    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
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  4. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    This is probably one of the few Chopin pieces I keep coming back again and again:

     
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  5. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Almost "Made"

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    God, that's beautiful. How did I never hear this before?

    Chopin is just overpowering. One nocturne after the other, each one a very specific rush of emotion.

    Maybe this is crazy, but I hear distinct parallels between Chopin and Domenico Scarlatti--only on certain of his slower sonatas. 2 examples:

    1. Sonata K. 87 in B Minor


    2. Sonata K. 8 in G Minor


    Sure Scarlatti is 150 years earlier and considered Baroque...but still. I hear something there.

    Then again, I hear some of these same mournful, elegiac qualities in Satie's "Gymnopedie" published 50 years after Chopin's death.
     
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  6. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    No, it's not crazy. I can hear it too. Problem is that IMO it's nothing to do with Scarlatti or Chopin but with the romanticization of the Baroque pieces by the pianists to make them more palatable for general consumption or for some other reason. Or, most likely, for no reason at all. Very few pianists have had the ability to be chameleon like and change the manner according to the era or composer. Richter could do it in the middle of his career, Gilels , not so much. Not a great fan of Pogorelich , to put it mildly.

    IMHO, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli was the only artist who had it all without adding any sentimental syrup. He was a technical pianist with incredible control of the instrument and impeccable sound.

    We shouldn't forget that music structure was probably the most important aspect at that period. Michelangeli was a very deep interpreter of Scarlatti . It's music for grown-ups.

     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2019
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  7. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    When Rostropovich heard Jacqueline Du Pre play the Elgar Concerto he said he would never perform it in public again. And he didn't. Second movement:

     
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  8. g_mr_p

    g_mr_p Acquaintance

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    That JdP/Barbirolli/LSO is quite a recording. In my opinion it's by far her most compelling take on the Concerto; not too much a fan of most of her other work (as sacrilegious as that is), find most of it a bit on the exaggerated or overindulgent side... but the balance on this early Elgar is just right for me, perhaps because it is closest to Tortelier's interpretation which is my favorite.

    Perhaps ironically, I also enjoy Rostropovich's Elgar despite not being a huge fan of his playing as well. That smooth, well-connected legato of his works quite well for so many passages.
     
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  9. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    Agree on all points. Listened to the Tortelier's just once long ago. Wasn't impressed. I have that record and will definitely re-visit it again. Too many great records...

    On Rostropovich. Brilliant though he was technically ( only Starker IMO might be close in that regard) his interpretation was often lacking depth and insight. IMO.
     
  10. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Almost "Made"

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    Several have posted here about Beethoven's MISSA SOLEMNIS. I'm listening to the Benedictus right now.

    Of the 3 versions I have, this is the best by a very wide margin (Eugene Jochum conducting the Royal Concertgebow of Amsterdam & the Netherlands Radio Chorus). It's a 2-CD set, a leisurely interpretation with none of the rushed tempi some conductors favor. That works spectacularly well to reveal the dense layering & high drama (in a stately fashion) of this version. I can't get over the urgency & passion of Beethoven's liturgical writing. Just lovely.

    It doesn't hurt that I'm listening on a killer combination: Audio GD DAC-19, Liquid Carbon V2, and Jupiter Audio Research's amazing/extensive HD650 mod, the "JAR650."

    This music knocks me out...
     
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  11. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    What are the other two? I've got Klemperer and Karajan.
     
  12. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Almost "Made"

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    John Elliot Gardner w/the Monteverdi Choir; Phillippe Herrewhege w/the Collegium Vocale

    (both are terrific in many other recordings, not so much on the Missa Solemnis IMHO)
     
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  13. g_mr_p

    g_mr_p Acquaintance

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    I get the feeling that not many people share my enthusiasm for Tortelier, haha. In particular I find his live Elgar on the BBC Legends label to be absolutely captivating (Boult/BBC, same ensemble as his best-known studio take); makes his several other recordings sound a bit dry in comparison, really.

    Yeah, I can't really dispute Rostropovich's rightful place in the pantheon, but he's just usually not to my taste outside of all that repertoire written specifically for him (in which he is authoritative, of course).
    Nonetheless, I can certainly think of some other Slava that I really enjoy: His Schelomo with Bernstein/ONF is so intense and colorful, and I'll never forget that last winding-down passage at the end of the infamous "Prague Spring" Dvorak with Svetlanov/USSR... rendered at a snail's pace, so softly and painfully that he can barely be heard over the orchestra (which is also playing soft). Maybe not the most musical, but the most vulnerable and supplicatory playing I've ever heard.
     
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  14. ColtMrFire

    ColtMrFire Friend

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    If this isn't just the perfect encapsulation of why we love classical I don't know what is. Listen to Lenny talk to these young people about what it all means...

     
  15. yvv

    yvv Acquaintance

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    Transcendent:
     
  16. Muse Wanderer

    Muse Wanderer Friend

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    I am listening to Bruno Weil's interpretation of Schubert's D950 mass with the Age of Enlightenment Orchestra and I am in awe at the magnificent period instrument sound combined with an all male orchestra that impinges a darker hue on this mass.

    The Kyrie starts soothingly and reassuringly. Simply beautiful soon taking us on a roller coaster when the whole chorus sings Christe eleison, lifting us to the top of a mountain range ...



    The rendition is crisp, driven but still enchanting to listen to. The microdetail, microdynamics and clarity is top notch being a relatively modern recording to the older Sawallich or Giulini. The voices are much clearer sounding. The boy's choir matches the lower voices whilst the orchestra does not dominate the sound. There is a part in the Credo (at 6min), when a boy soloist starts to sing 'Incarnatus est' and his timbre is way agreeable to a soprano for this setting.

    The dynamics are wide and engrossing. As I listen to the Gloria, the softness of the voices as they sing 'miserere' is interrupted by crescendos that are beautifully rendered on speakers. The staging and the reverb of the church it was recorded in is well rendered.
    Gloria
    Credo

    I listened to the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment during Malta's Baroque festival 2 weeks ago and their Bach's St Matthew's Passion with John Butt was top notch. Their playing on this recording also reminds me of their great Messiah recording - utmost clarity and defined sound that matches the voices so well.

    As I approach the final movements, The Sanctus has so much energy..



    Benedictus brings temporary relief,

    but the real treat is the Angus Dei. Oh my goodness this is beyond belief transcendence with mind penetrating brass repeating their ostinati with a rhythm that sends shockwaves to the spine, only relieved when at the 4 min mark Dona Nobis Pacem brings peace and harmony to our being.

    Schubert, suffering with end stage syphilis three months before his agonising death at 31 years of age, brings on the darkness again at the 6 minute mark as if a final battle between good and evil is being fought but this is short-lived and E flat major lights our way...

     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
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  17. Pharmaboy

    Pharmaboy Almost "Made"

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    "lovely" ... the word that always comes to mind when I listen to Schubert. As a 6 year old I would trance out for hours to my parents' LP versions of his symphonies. Years later when I realized he'd also written liturgical music, it was like finding money in the street. "Yes!"

    I have a different recording of this, but the feelings produced are exactly the same. A beautiful composition.

    Have to rummage around my stored CDs and get out my Schubert recordings. I miss them!
     
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  18. Muse Wanderer

    Muse Wanderer Friend

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    Schubert is absolutely loveable I agree. His piano sonatas played by Brendel have been carried with me on my phone for the past 4 years. I managed to delete every other music to make space but this complete set is too important for those times when only Schubert's music can do.

     
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  19. Muse Wanderer

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    Over the past 5 years I have been on a mission to listen to all of Haydn's symphonies. It took time to really digest Haydn's music as he does not get hold of you like Mozart with his emotional perfection or Beethoven's contrasts and surprises. Haydn's pieces tend to quickly turn into background music if one does not give his full attention to it. That said Haydn is a brilliant jolly composer, full of humour with lots of twists and turns in his music that puts a smile on my face.

    I was already familiar with Davies' set from 92 till 104 with favourites being 94 'Surprise', 101 'The Clock' and 104 'London'. I have Dorati's set as a benchmark for repeated listens with Pinnock, Colin Davies, Russell Davies, Goodman and Fischer as added listening.

    When I started from his 1st ten symphonies I was struck by his use of counterpoint earlier on in his career with symphony no 3. His 6th 'Le matin' impressed me. 'Lamentatione' (26nd) showed some darkness (finally). His Sturm and Drang phase (40s symphonies) was awesome! His 39th, 45th 'Farewell', 44th 'Trauer' and 49th 'La Passione' were dark and at times furious.

    Haydn's 60s symphonies were all a treat to listen to and truly remarkable. The 64th symphony 'Tempora Mutandur' stood out as a wonderful example of this period. As soon as I reached his 80s, it started to really rock with great pieces like the 82nd 'The Bear', 83rd 'The Hen' and 85th 'Le Reine'.

    Finally this week I went through his last few symphonies to finish off once and for all the whole Dorati set and here I stumble on his perfect masterpiece. The only piece that is great from start to finish (even the minuet!!)... symphony number 88!! This is my absolute favourite...

     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019 at 1:15 PM
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