Ultrasound audibility

Discussion in 'Audio Science' started by Serious, Jul 7, 2019.

?

Is Serious losing his mind?

  1. It sure seems like it

    10 vote(s)
    23.3%
  2. No, more research needs to be done on the limits of human perception

    27 vote(s)
    62.8%
  3. Maybe

    12 vote(s)
    27.9%
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  1. Raimei Templar

    Raimei Templar Almost "Made"

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    Dont think this study has been linked yet but https://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/1.5063819 found that some people did suffer adverse effects from frequencies that they can no longer actually hear. The study in questions used frequencies ranging from 13.5khzto 20khz on people who could not longer actually hear them based on their hearing tests. Very interesting results, basically people exposed to the high frequencies experienced feelings of irritation and had difficultly concentrating on a task. Not "true" ultrasonics as that is within the human hearing range but those people had lost that hearing.

    The study came to being after people found that the goddamn mosquito sonic weapon used in Europe was causing them irritation I believe. Those things should be banned, I cant believe people are ok with destroying kids hearing like that. I have seen reports of it as much as 108db in volume! A teenager will just leave before there is any serious damage but what about a parent taking a baby around, baby will be having their ears murdered and parents might just feel mild irritation not realizing what is happening. Infuriates me as a parent.

    Study also brings up a very interesting point which is that part of the reason there arent more studies of ultrasonic sounds is that in many cases to truly find out if there were any adverse effects you would need to expose the subjects to very high volumes 100bs/spl or more which is unethical for any researcher who actually believes it will do harm to do. I think people handwave away the effects of ultra and infasonic partially because they arent accounting for what might happen if they are exposed to very high volumes rather the relatively low noise from CRTs and such.
     
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  2. evonimos

    evonimos Rando

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    I know i hear zero above 15kHz.
    However, i can't rule out rare super-abilities in other people.

    Myself even might be able to do it, after being treated with a secret brew of Kykeon...
     
  3. Armaegis

    Armaegis Friend

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    An issue with research into high frequency whatevers (not specifically the paper linked above) is that they often use this fuzzy word "audibility" as your defining point or boundary condition, but then they have this wacky broad spectrum of physiological responses that result from ultrasonics and they link it back into the fuzzy audible realm.

    Like... stare at a light for a while, your eyes will strain if it's too bright, ok cool that's a quantifiable response. Now lets do a couple short tests at shorter and shorter wavelengths until we're into UV, and hey that's interesting your eye doesn't react anymore. That means we're obviously beyond the visible limit. Now let's shine a bright UV light into the eyeballs, oh would you look at that I can smell smoke. Obviously UV must be affecting our visible sight somehow!
     
  4. gixxerwimp

    gixxerwimp Professional tricycle rider

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    That triggered memories of the laser treatment I had to weld my detached vitreous back in place. Thanks :confused:

    Right Fundas image.jpg
     
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  5. Ruby Rod

    Ruby Rod Facebook Friend

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    FWIW, there's at least one Knowles MEMs microphone that goes well over 100 kHz, maybe as high as 200 khz, and they're not terribly expensive. Personally I can't hear much above 12.5 kHz and have never found ultrasonics, even at high levels, audible. It's also very hard to reproduce them without creating at least some artifacts.
     
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