Thoughts about distortion behavior

Discussion in 'Audio Science' started by purr1n, Jul 1, 2019.

  1. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    That could do more harm than good. Music doesn't consist of steady state sine waves and the simple burst response experiments I've done would indicate drastically different distortion numbers on the signal areas which haven't yet reached steady state (start and stop, which seems to take a few cycles or so). And even if steady-state, the distortion isn't easily predictable. There is a reason why it's called non-linear.
     
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  2. Ringingears

    Ringingears Honorary BFF

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    Just curious. But with decent gear, how much of the distortion do we really hear? I remember the “distortion of the distortion wars” of the 1970’s. The peak to peak crap, using very misleading distortion numbers on cheap shitty gear etc. Good 70’s gear didn’t seem to have distortion issues.
     
  3. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    The real question is what's the distortion of measurement extremists' woofers playing 37Hz at 100dbSPL, and how do those distortion figures compare to the distortion produced by DACs in the bottom quartile of distortion measurements (let's take away the obviously badly performing ones, bottom 1%, e.g. A-GD S19, etc.).
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
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  4. Armaegis

    Armaegis Friend

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    Don't think you can really do that. It's like trying to use dsp voodoo to reduce room modes... doesn't really work per se. You can wonk the FR to try and smooth out the perceived response, but physics is physics and sound waves will interact with each other unless you change how they bounce/reflect from the walls. Your speakers can fake an echo, but they can't really take one out.
     
  5. lashto

    lashto Rando

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    A very interesting and highly welcome discussion. And sounds like y‘all are into something so don’t stop :)
     

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