Mountain Bike Search

Discussion in 'Outdoor World' started by purr1n, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    Nice on the Chise! 29er. The 27.5+ (which I realized has the same rolling diameter as a 29) has really grown on me because I'm older now and suck, and also because the bigger tires provide a much easier learning platform for my daughter to hit the easier trails. I went down to the LBS (local bike shop) to check out a Fuse 27.5+. Unfortunately, not a single one in sight; they may have sold just one in the past several months. Hardtails just don't sell in my area. The sales guy was sympathetic as he rode a Fuse. The bikes that sold the most were full suspension (totally not necessary as the local area is mostly climbs, and most paths zigzag or are shared with hikers, preventing insane downhill shenanigans.) Half of the full suspension bikes on display were also electric assist, go figure. (I find this extremely disturbing).

    So I head to the Trek dealer for a closer look at the Roscoe. This is a weird mountain bike. The M size felt too tall, and the S felt too cramped lengthwise. Also noted steering was twitchy for such a pushed back seating position (Procaliber was no better, but not in consideration because I'm pretty set on the 27.5+) WTH I'm thinking because this bike can't be good for climbs and the steering seemed a bit too twitchy for downhill. I guess I'm kind of surprised because Trek seems to be such a trusted name (then again, I've only owned x2 Trek road bikes, not MTBs). Maybe they make stuff for people with super long legs and short torsos. I am the opposite.

    Anyway, on the shortlist are the Diamondback Sync'r, Specialized Fuse, and Salsa TImberjack. All these bike suit me better with longer top tube relative to the stack. I'd have to use a 100mm stem on the Trek Roscoe, and that would feel weird. Also, the seating is more directly over the pedals than on the Trek. I'd get another 2018 Pantera if I can find another at S size with 1x and SLX or better parts (the SLX stuff barely cuts it, but I've been spoiled with XTR/XT in the past).

    This is a pain. I've love to support the LBS, but if they don't stock what I want, what I can I do?

    Also, what's up with Trek's 141mm rear hub? This is all so confusing today.
    I found out we were riding the bike with the clutch on RD off.
    I'm assuming the proper size fork for a 27.5+ would be a 29.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
  2. Cspirou

    Cspirou They call me Sparky

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    I've been using Motobecane. It has a fairly heavy frame, but it's the best bike I've ever had. I bought it used from someone that took it on 10 ft drops and I didn't feel any problems with it.
     
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  3. OJneg

    OJneg The Most Insufferable

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    Treks are for lanky Germanics. My legs are a fit, but my arms seem too short. On a road bike it's fine because you just lean in and you're not steering most the time anyway. Don't have much experience with the MTBs tho.

    Where was the quote in OP from? Do we have a road bike thread?
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  4. yotacowboy

    yotacowboy McRibs Kind of Guy

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    MY19 Fuse is going to be hard to find because they're out of stock at Specialized. The MY20 Fuse just dropped Monday:

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/fuse-27-5/p/171070?color=263341-171070

    The west coast warehouse is showing 1 in the red, size small, available. I'd just tell the dealer to STFU and order a small for a test ride. It's not your job to sell bikes, it's their job. You're in California so you could see it by Friday if any of your local dealers have good ship terms w/ specialized.

    Roscoe: I'm not a fan of the geometry, either. None of us at the shop could figure out what Trek was going for with it. It's not slacked-out enough head tube to be a trail bike w/130mm of travel and it's too heavy/big-tire'd/slacked out STA to be an XC bike. Also, Trek got smacked with a recall and lawsuits over some stupid shit with QR skewers a few years ago. Since then they've been making up goofy interpretations of the hub standards that use their own proprietary threaded skewer/thru-axle crap. I don't like Trek. Their carbon road bikes (except for the TOTL Madone) ride like broomsticks and cardboard boxes held together with scotch tape.

    Salsa Timberjack is good value for money, you're getting a "real" fork on there versus the Judy on the Fuse. We stopped carrying Salsa, so I haven't any direct experience with this bike, but its got solid trail geometry, a smart build, and quality parts where you want them.
     
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  5. Kernel Kurtz

    Kernel Kurtz Friend

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    Coming from a hardtail with front suspension to a full suspension bike was kind of an aha, this is what I have been missing moment. Yes, it is more expensive and heavier (unless even more more expensive), but even on the pretty mild river trails I ride I love it. And of course it has lockouts, so if you want it to be a hardtail and/or rigid fork it is just a click away.

    Of course I am not kidding myself, I'm 54 and totally not able to ride my bike to the potential it is capable of, but conversely, it is more than capable of doing anything I can throw at it no problem. A bike you can feel confident on is a good attribute.
     
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  6. Deep Funk

    Deep Funk Deep thoughts - Friend

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    This is the Batavus B1 cross/mountainbike. I have a similar one with mud-protectors/flaps. Given I am about 5ft 10-ish my saddle is a bit lower. Love it. Heavy frame makes it really stable with a lower centre of gravity/weight and with wide tires it has enormous amounts of grip. Front-suspension alone is sufficient for me but extra back-suspension does add more comfort.

    Surprisingly nimble and a joy to hustle through the city.

    [​IMG]

    Given I bought it used about 2 years ago, the chain and cogs needed replacement. Think 250-ish Euros but well worth it. A single-speed conversion was not possible. Even when I am tired I cannot help but speed up sometimes...
     
  7. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    Tell me about it. I tried to hit some of the steeper hills around my area. I conked out twice on the way up where I too easily hit anaerobic and maxed out heart rate. In fact, I didn't even make it up to the top. I forgot how unfriendly terrain (evidently, people stopped hitting some of the trails after the big fires last year, so they are overgrown) makes things x10 harder than paved roads. I'm thinking to myself, how the heck did I ever do this? I mean I used to enjoy climbing and leaving my buddies behind as they looked up in bewilderment. Then my wife reminds me that I was 24 when I did that.
     
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  8. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    Holy cow! When did this come out?

    I ended up ordering the Fuse Comp 29 x 2.6 Eagle at my LBS. Just easier and can bring back for free adjustments.
    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/fuse-comp-29/p/171069?color=263340-171069

    The 2.8 are just a bit wider than I need. I still have my biking skills, somewhat, and with a 29, I can probably just roll over shit easier. Better frame and Eagle 12spd stuff too. I have no doubt the new SX line is gonna suck ass, but I've always chucked the rear shifters and/or derailleurs and opted for near TOTL stuff within three months.

    With the 2020 Fuse, Specialized addressed two things from the prior year: lowered standover and stretched out the frame, which makes me super happy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
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  9. WhiteNoise

    WhiteNoise Acquaintance

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    I've tried full-suspension bikes but I always prefer a hardtail. I feel that I have more control over the rear-end. Plus I feel like I get more power down when the rear is firm.

    Now my back isn't what it used to be so I do use a suspension seat post. This gives me the softer ride when sitting but when standing I get the solid control of a hard-tail.

    Not dissing full suspension of course. I just thought I'd post my thoughts on using a hard-tail.

    It is a bit funky looking but it works amazingly well.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. murphythecat

    murphythecat Friend

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    this thread couldnt come at a better time.
    I was dead set on buying at the year end sales the Roscoe 8; it seemed to be some of the best value around my price range but now this thread make me second guess my choice.

    I'm looking for a hardtail, around the Roscoe 8 pricing. the fuse 27.5 seem nice... totally lost with all the choices out there...

    ive read the fuse comp is a piece of crap...
     
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  11. crazychile

    crazychile Eastern Iowa's Spiciest Pepper

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    I don't do mud like I used to on my MB, so after wanting one for a long time, I put one of those old school Brooks saddles on mine with the built in springs. "Real" MB'ers would scoff at that but I don't care. It's a nice ride and I'm not trying to shave grams of weight off the bike.
     
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  12. yotacowboy

    yotacowboy McRibs Kind of Guy

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    I haven't ridden a Fuse yet (all of the MY20 bikes we've ordered have been sold) but judging by the parts spec on the Comp, it's definitely not crap. SRAM NX Eagle on my bike so far has been flawless; I'm really impressed how well a cheap groupo is doing. I had thought I would upgrade to AXS at the end of this season because I want to try out the electronic stuff, but I think I'll wait until the NX Eagle stuff shits the bed. My only gripe with it is how heavy the PG30 11-50T cassette is, but at least on the Fuse you're only looking at a 11-42T.
     
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  13. Kernel Kurtz

    Kernel Kurtz Friend

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    I hear ya. I went through a bunch of cheap suspension seat posts with poor reliability. Probably should have paid for a good one like that.

    And can't argue there is much appeal to a solid bike frame. When locked out my bike still has noticeable play, I assume because there are so many connection points, at least in the back. And of course, such a thing still ends up being a point of debate...

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/opinion-lockout-levers-make-for-worse-bikes.html

    It's almost like audio equipment with all these options....







     
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  14. Deep Funk

    Deep Funk Deep thoughts - Friend

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    One of my favourite MTBs was a full suspension Gazelle Alu-Lite Extreme. It really was lighter than my backpack with laptop and books. Sprints were fast (over-taking mopeds was fun). Sliding around (that back-wheel control!) was kind of addicting and I used to scare tourists by breaking late (the chaos in Amsterdam turned into a game of dodge & sprint).

    I am more of a cruiser than a racer. So hard-tail is more to my liking.
     
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  15. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    @murphythecat: The MY20 Roscoe and Fuse are totally different in terms of geometry and approach. Most notably, the Fuse has a longer top tube and reach. This lends itself to folks who prefer a lower less upright riding position and/or have a longer torso or arm length. The Roscoe is actually taller and shorter, which might be suited to folks with longer legs and shorter torso, or prefer a more upright ride.

    The head angle is more relaxed on the Fuse whereas the Roscoe's is steeper (more responsive but twitchier). The more relaxed angle on the Fuse is partially offset by the very short stem.

    As far as the seat angle, the Roscoe's is more relaxed, meaning you sit a bit farther back on the bike. The Fuse is steeper which means you are on top of the pedals. This is a matter of preference. I prefer to be on top of the pedals, and when I go downhill I get off the seat and shift my butt back.

    The Fuse Comp does have the SX Eagle rear derailleur and shifter. I guess you can argue that these parts suck. SX is bottom-barrel, but it does work. I really can't say much about what happens with longer-term use because I tossed them rather quickly and upgraded to the X01 Eagle parts. I don't think the Fuse Comp is a particularly great value, but the decision was a no brainer for me because the frame geometry was exactly what I was looking for without spending $4k on a boutique brand. If I had the time, I would have just purchased the frame and built a bike up from scratch.

    The latest RL Recon fork is fantastic. It's notably stiffer than the prior version with the silver stanchions. And this is coming from a lighter rider who is more of a spinner than masher. The suspension is much more responsive to small bumps, I think it has to do with the dark coating on the stanchions, maybe trickle-down tech. The downside is that it's heavy. The Fuse Comp is a heavy bike relative to the Roscoe. It seems that the weight-weenie thing is no longer in vogue, which is a good thing. I'm finding the superior solidity, planted-ness, and predictable handling worth for an additional pound or two.

    Yes, the Roscoe is a better deal in terms of components. But for me, it just wasn't going to work. The Roscoe rode opposite to what I preferred. How the bike rides for you is much more important than parts quality. Parts are just parts. They wear out or break over time. For the MY20 Fuse, Specialized tweaked a few things: stretched out the bike, lowered the standover, and increased the aggressiveness of the geometry. I could not resist a bike that I felt was almost custom made for me and I was willing to pay a premium for it.

    Finally, note that the Fuse 29 will take 27.5+ wheels.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
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  16. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

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    The 29" tires on the Fuse Comp are 2.6" wide, so they are slightly + sized. I'm a short rider at 5' 8". The guy at the LBS said I would be better off with 27.5" wheels, but he was full of it. I think he might have wanted to clear MY19 stock.

    I'd say the 29" x2.6" wheels might be a little less tossable, maybe slightly more effort pulling the front and back wheels up or around, jumping over stuff, etc. The upside is that you can just run over anything. The 27.5+ (I think 2.8") on the GT Pantera was marginally more tossable, more forgiving, but ultimately too "beach ball", particularly now that I've gotten back into the swing of things. This could also be because the old model Recon RL fork is lighter on the GT. As for grip, the tread pattern of the tires is just as important as width, I'm riding on sand, sandstone, loose clay, and leftover crap from the fires last year. I'm getting way better traction on the narrower 29" Purgatory than the wider 27.5 Schwalb Rocket Rons. I was apprehensive about the 29" x 2.6" size, but I don't think I would go back to 27.5.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
  17. yotacowboy

    yotacowboy McRibs Kind of Guy

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    Marv - are you running tubeless? Honestly the big volume tires get so much better running tubeless. I’m more an XC guy, so I’m happy on 2.4’s, but for higher speed west coast style trails, you gotta give tubeless a whirl. 29x2.6 would be good around 22-26psi, tubeless.
     

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