Outdoor/Travel Carry

Discussion in 'Outdoor World' started by fraggler, Feb 23, 2018.

  1. fraggler

    fraggler A Happy & Busy Life

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2015
    Likes Received:
    1,957
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Glad the seal was finally broken on this sub-forum, as I was into outdoor gear before I got into audio. I know Marvey has a specific review coming for an Osprey bag, but I thought a general bag/carry discussion thread would be cool.

    Personally, I am a huge Osprey fanboy. Over the years, I have auditioned many, many bags, from many, many brands, and I always seem to come back to Osprey, mainly for their great suspensions and their killer warranty. Currently, I have 3 different sizes of backpack from them, plus a convertible carry-on (and a pack for my girlfriend). Their warranty support is unreal, as well. After 8 years of use, my original carry-on finally got a mangled handle (it must have gotten caught on something one of only few times it got checked). I asked Osprey how much it would cost to get a replacement handle, happy to pay since I loved the bag, but they said they would just replace the whole thing. I only had to pay to ship my bag to them. Super impressed. Seeing LL Bean finally change their life time guarantee due to abuse, I hope there aren't too many people abusing the Osprey policy.

    For a very light day pack that I use as my daily carry when traveling abroad, I really like the Daylight Plus. https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/daylite-plus-DAYLITEPL_389.html
    Just a ventilated foam sheet for the back panel, so very lightweight and flexible. Downside is that you can't really load it up, but with just 20L of space, you probably wouldn't be. Just enough pockets to keep things separated, though when traveling a couple more internally would be nice. Still, when carrying just the essentials, it works well. Packs basically flat for when not in use. Something I hope they fix (and they have gotten a lot of feedback on this) for the next generation is to change the side stretch pockets. Right now they are terrible for carrying water bottles. Not enough elastic to compensate for the weird cut of the fabric. I don't mind much since I can still stuff other things into them and use the kangaroo pouch to hold a water bottle. Once I figure out how, I might add a drawstring to each pocket so they become a little more useful.

    *For 90% of my air travel, I use the Meridian 22. https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/meridian-60l-22-MERIDN22_637.html
    Unless I need specialty gear or clothing (like a wedding or climbing a mountain), this bag has been all I needed for up to 3 weeks of travel abroad. That probably speaks more to how I travel, but it also means that this bag has seen and survived quite a bit. It has a sturdy frame and spine, but has a soft, padded surround and a soft "top." This allows it to cram a little bit more easily into overhead bins and rarely gets flagged for checking on smaller planes even though it technically measures a little too large for international limits. It has the best wheels on luggage I have ever used. Basically rollerblade wheels that have never shown even a hint of wobble and have great smoothness of motion and turning. The handles are rock solid as well, with only a tiny bit of wiggle, and have been strong enough to carry a packed duffel and frame pack while being pulled - much nicer than most entry level luggage and even a not-inexpensive Timbuk2 carry on. The zip out pack straps and waist belt have only had serious use twice, but it allowed me to comfortably carry my luggage on my back while walking around temples while waiting for my Airbnb check in time. For travel domestically, I tend to remove the straps and use the extra space that provides. This model comes with a pretty decent day pack that zips/clips onto the front, though I tend to use the aforementioned Daylight Plus since it is lighter and has better functionality. If I were to buy new luggage today, I would look at the Sojourn 22, which is basically the Meridian without the included daypack. One big caveat is that the most current model of the Meridian has for some reason gotten rid of the waistbelt. Maybe most people don't do extended carries if they opt for this model so shoulder straps or good enough, but I can't imagine carrying something that weighs as much as luggage without a waistbelt to distribute the load. I don't know how many people will even want the pack straps, so maybe the missing waistbelt doesn't matter, but I hope they bring it back before I need a new one.

    I also have a Kestrel 32 that I took up Mt Fuji which I love, but don't have time to review at the moment. https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/kestrel-32-KESTREL32.html

    I also have an almost 15 year old hiking pack with glorious Airspeed suspension that is still kicking and best for the warmer weather hiking. I can't really remember, but I think it is a Stratos. https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/stratos-24-STRATOS24_328.html

    My girlfriend used this beauty on Fuji: https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/mira-ag-34-MIRA34_323.html I would have gotten the male version instead of the Kestrel for myself, but it was sized really weirdly for anyone that didn't have a short torso and very trim waist and hips. Fit my girlfriend nicely, though. Very nice suspension if it fits you.

    *And yes, after typing up all that about the carry on luggage, I realized it wasn't really relevant to the Outdoor World subforum unless you want to add 8lbs of bag and wheels to your next hiking expedition. Making the allowance for favorite travel bags as well in this thread.

    Anyways, please share your favorite bags!
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2018
    Vansen, jacq, Dino and 3 others like this.
  2. msommers

    msommers High on Epipens

    Friend
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Likes Received:
    2,095
    Dislikes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Home Page:
    I've had a few bags over the years and so happy with mesh suspension systems available now.

    Day hikes I like using the Deuter Futura 32. Fits my 5'5" frame better than my Gregory Z30 which I lost awhile ago. You can load it up with pretty heavy stuff and the hip belt and suspension system handle it very well.

    Overnight bag is an Osprey Ariel 65. It's actually a women's bag but fits me better and came in a nicer colour! The hip belt is moldable so no complaints there.

    Also have a Deuter bike racing bag which is really nice for cycling or hiking when I'm not taking my DSLR. It's so light and breathable it's nice to have the option.

    Girlfriend has a Gregory Jade 53 and it's a damn nice backpack. She took it on her first overnight trip and really liked it. She's about 5'2".

    I'm a bit of an Arcteryx whore but their backpacks just don't do it for me.
     
  3. JustAnotherRando

    JustAnotherRando My other bike is a Ferrari

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2017
    Likes Received:
    895
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    This will be brief as it's 2am over here. After Japanese whisky so please forgive any messy language.

    I've been a bit of a pack nut most my adult life, and also very difficult to fit- super skinny hips that don't work with most waist belts, really slim shoulders but an unusually long torso. In order of roughly ascending size, my most fondly remembered packs have been:

    Wingnut 2.5. 9L. Far as I can tell, Wingnut is run by a single guy who closes up shop occasionally. Weird looking harness system with lowriding packs which are incredibly comfortable for riding and hiking. The most convenient side pockets I've ever seen on a pack.
    http://www.wingnutgear.com/shop/twopointfive

    Black Diamond Bullet. 16L, I believe this is no longer made. Great knock around urban bag that can be used equally well outdoors as long as you don't need to carry much. I just checked, it's still made but it seems to have changed shape and pocket design.
    New version is here: http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en/climbing-packs/bullet-16-pack-BD681156_cfg.html

    Peak Designs 30L pack. This pack is probably all over the West Coast these days. Best designed versatile camera bag I've managed to find. Well made, sleek for it's capacity, and it makes a good carry-on travel bag. The magnetic latch on the top flap sounds terribly gimmicky but works brilliantly well. The downsides are that the shoulder/chest straps are not the most comfortable- I would not use this as a hiking pack. And that the bottom of the pack is curved so the pack isn't freestanding.
    https://www.peakdesign.com/everyday-backpack

    Osprey Kestrel Pro (late 90s, no longer made). 30-35L toploader, excellent for carrying climbing gear, incredibly durable.

    Ergon BC3. Maybe 35L. Again, no longer in production as the construction costs were probably too high, and it looked too weird to sell well. It uses a ball and socket joint which allows complete freedom of movement whilst fully loaded- I had no idea how constricting normal packs were for climbing or riding until I tried this.
    http://www.bikepacking.net/reviews/packs/ergon-bc3/ <-- You need to check this out, it looks really weird.

    McHale custom. Perhaps 110L. This thing is astounding. Made by an idiosyncratic craftsman based in Seattle (he still seems to be operating). It uses a unique hipbelt and shoulder strap construction, and is the only load carrier I've ever used that is comfortable. I've tried Gregory/Osprey/Macpac/One Planet/everything I could get my hands on, and they all hurt. With the McHale, I can carry so much that my legs will give out from the weight before I feel discomfort in my back or shoulders. It's made of spectra/dyneema and so is massively abrasion resistant, it's quadruple stitched along main seams (including a row of spectra stitching). The removal of a couple of aluminum 7075 struts will collapse the pack down to about 60L. This thing is built to last decades, versus modern packs which incorporate stretch materials or external mesh panels, which I expect to last less than ten years.
    http://www.mchalepacks.com/ultralight/index.htm

    TNF Duffle. 140L for the XXL size. THE standard expedition bag which also makes for an international travel bag. You can fit crazy amounts of shopping into it, you can fit all your winter outdoor gear into it, and you can throw your fully loaded proper backpack into it.
    https://www.thenorthface.com/shop/base-camp-duffelmedium-cww2#hero=0
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
    fraggler likes this.
  4. fraggler

    fraggler A Happy & Busy Life

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2015
    Likes Received:
    1,957
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I liked the design of the Gregory Z30 very much, and it was a finalist with the Kestrel, but something was just off for me about how it distributed the weight. But I have kind of an odd body. Broad back and barrel chested, average to below average torso length. So packs with comfortable shoulder straps sometimes don't have the hipbelts in the right place and too much weight will be on the front parts of my shoulders no matter how I shift the straps and weight.
     
  5. Vansen

    Vansen Gear Master (retiring)

    Staff Member Friend
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    2,294
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Seattle
    I use two packs to travel with:


    Gossamer Gear Murmur 36 Hyperlight
    https://www.gossamergear.com/collections/all/products/murmur-36-hyperlight-backpack


    Osprey Talon 44
    https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/talon-44-TALON44.html


    The Gossamer Gear Murmur 36 only weighs 374 grams. It is very light. I use it for all of my international travel. I've traveled 14 days with it for a combo of city/ hiking/ beach use. With careful gear selection (no WM1A on these trips), I could travel indefinitely with this pack. If I'm not doing heavy hiking, my pack comes in at about 4.5 kg. If I have my hiking stuff loaded up, I hit about 7 kg. This is a pack that you definitely do not want to check as luggage.


    The Osprey Talon 44 comes in at 1.1 kg. It’s around the same weight as the larger packs (50 – 60L) from ULA or Gossamer, but fits my capacity and comfort needs better. I also feel that it’s a bit more durable. I’ve owned this bag since 2009 and have checked it at airports quite a few times. The only damage it has is where my bear canister has worn through it from airport handling. Tenacious Tape has done wonders to repair this damage. Though it’s capacity is small in most folks’ eyes, it’d be my pick for the entire PCT. With my current gear, my base pack weight comes in at 7.4kg. I want to drop that down to 6 kg for my upcoming hike of the full John Muir Trail.


    I also have a small Osprey Daylite, but it’s only 13L and weighs 100g more than my Gossamer and only sees a small amount of use these days.
     
    fraggler likes this.
  6. jacq

    jacq Top 3 poster - friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2015
    Likes Received:
    699
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Thanks for the backpack tips guys, I currently have an InCase EO but I'd love to get something ultralight like the @Vansen's Gossamer Gear although I don't have any immediate trips to use it yet. I love it when people talk about ultralight because it just seems so unique to each person. I'm trying to find my sweet spot of having around 25-30L of things to bring per trip.
     
    Vansen likes this.
  7. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

    Staff Member Friend BWC
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2015
    Likes Received:
    45,217
    Dislikes Received:
    70
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Antarctica
    I figure I will follow up and add one entry for now: the Osprey Stratos 24. I will also cover the Sirrus 24 (Women's version) very briefly.

    Osprey Stratos 24
    Every bag has a purpose. It's important to get the right bag for the right reasons. Most of the hikes that I take are under 8 miles don't necessitate a volume of 24L. I could have gone for the Talon 11, which would have been an more appropriate size. However, the Stratos 24 does offer more flexibility in that it is better suited for a full day hike, or when I decide I want to go some random direction to extend a planned hike a few more miles, which I do sometimes do to piss my wife off.

    A huge factor in my selection of the Stratos 24 over the Talon 11 (the Stratos doesn't come smaller than 24L) is the "Airspeed Suspension". The downside is less space inside the bag and extra weight from the metal supports - maybe a pound? The are two upsides:
    1. I don't feel anything jutting into my back from all the crap that I randomly throw in there (first aid kit, duct tape, whiskey flask, weed vaporizer, toilet paper, extra water bottles, food, etc.) and
    2. My back is kept cool. Keeping cool is a very serious issue where I live, even in the winter - it has been an unnaturally hot winter where I live in Malibu Canyon.
    Here is a photo that shows the air gap between the back of the bag and the support / netting.
    IMG_20180318_214649.jpg

    On a hot day, the netting is basically covered with sweat whenever I stop and take the bag off. Hip belts are attached the support / netting, and vertical adjustment of the hip belts is possible. The netting adheres via velcro to an cloth area at the top of the bag. It's a big chunk of velcro, so there is no slippage. The adjustment system actually works. I have a long torso and short legs, so we can see that I've adjusted the netting and the hip belts down a bit from stock position.
    IMG_20180208_105828.jpg

    After trying on several bags, one feature that I learned that I could not be without is a padded hip belt. This makes things so much more comfortable. It's a tradeoff of extra weight without having to worry about straps digging into the skin my hip or stomach area. There are little pockets that I put my wallet and keys in. They are not big enough to hold a large phone though.
    IMG_20180208_105958 (1).jpg

    One thing Osprey got rid of from the prior version of this bag are straps at the bottom to hold a sleeping bag. I wish they kept this. The bottom pocket holds a raincover (green).
    IMG_20180208_105914.jpg

    Once nice feature of the new version of this bag is that my wife calls the vagina pcoket - the vertical zipper pocket right on the back. This comes in super handy because it is easily accessible. I put the toilet paper there in case someone really needs to take shit on the trail - like now. We can see there is a tie / attachement for a small pickaxe, shovel, or trekking poles. I'll usually carry an extra set of trekking poles because someone in the hiking group will end up needing one (seems to always happen).
    IMG_20180208_105720.jpg

    An extra set of poles can also be carried on the front left harness. Note that there is a belt around the water bottle holders to keep things snug.
    IMG_20180208_105814.jpg
    So generally I do find this bag too big for my half day hikes, but given its comfort and flexibility - and tha fact that I like to be super prepared and I'm not a ultralighter (heck I put weight into my bag to get a better workout), it works for me. I may consider the Talon 11 in cooler weather though.

    P.S.

    The Sirrus women's version has the harnesses placed narrower and the hip belts farther up to account for shorter torsos. The hip belts also flare out a little bit to account for women's wider hips.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2018
    jexby likes this.
  8. zerodeefex

    zerodeefex Grumpiest admin

    Staff Member Friend BWC
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2015
    Likes Received:
    8,989
    Dislikes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I need to get my custom bags out

    I have a full blackout dyneema truce designs clamshell with the dopp pack and a custom osprey they did for my old company as well. I love them both to death but the truce designs is getting 99% of my usage. It weighs less than my iPad pro and feels great in use.
     
  9. zerodeefex

    zerodeefex Grumpiest admin

    Staff Member Friend BWC
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2015
    Likes Received:
    8,989
    Dislikes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I like that it has the water bottle holders. I need a replacement bag for airport use and that's important for my family. Do you know if this fits under seats? I'm really interested in updating our old travel day pack.
     
  10. purr1n

    purr1n Finding his inner redneck

    Staff Member Friend BWC
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2015
    Likes Received:
    45,217
    Dislikes Received:
    70
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Antarctica
    It's actually a pretty big bag - I don't think it will fit under the seats. This should give you an idea.
    IMG_20180317_122216.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2018
    JK47 likes this.
  11. Bobcat

    Bobcat Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Likes Received:
    236
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Texas
    Home Page:
    If you’re a photographer, you should take a look at F-Stop bags (https://fstopgear.com/). Their packs are made to contain Internal Camera Units. These allow you to customize the pack to contain more or less camera gear. When I’m at an air show I have their largest pack with their largest ICU which allows me to carry a pro Nikon AND a 500mm f4 plus another camera and a few other lenses and plenty of accessories. But I can put in a smaller ICU if I’m doing day hiking and want smaller lenses for more general photography as well as hiking equipment. Or the pack can have no ICU at all for backpacking.

    My particular pack isn’t made anymore, but it’s similar to https://fstopgear.com/products/packs/tilopa . Yeah, 50L :)

    Wonderful gear and great to work with.

    Rob
     
  12. marflao

    marflao Facebook Friend

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2016
    Likes Received:
    49
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Germany
    You might have a look at the Talon22.
    Haven’t put in under the seat yet but at least it has the size to be allowed on board.

    Bought the extra rain coat (the yellow glimpse) „Hi-Vis Small“ which doesn’t fit like a glove meaning that even if the backpack would be full there is still some space until it would be filled.
    But it’s ok...rain is kept away :)

    https://photos.app.goo.gl/PFMPDCyvzXzmKIAo1
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2018
  13. msommers

    msommers High on Epipens

    Friend
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Likes Received:
    2,095
    Dislikes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Home Page:
    F-Stop does make really quality gear. I recently sold off my large Tilopa when I was hauling lots of stuff with cameras gear even as a nice container just to haul lenses.

    Build quality is very good and mostly everything has been well thought out by someone who actually hikes and actually is a photographer!

    My biggest beef with it and eventually selling was because of no sizing. I'm average build but 5' 6" and it was just a bit too big and the hip belt was too stiff for my liking -- I also had the belt basically bottoming out because of my dainty hips. A friend who eventually bought a Tilopa is 6' at least, I'm sure 180lb and fits him much better.

    Again, wonderful bags with purpose and quality. I hope they got their shipping and inventory issues finally sorted out.
     
  14. Bobcat

    Bobcat Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Likes Received:
    236
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Texas
    Home Page:
    True, it’s a BIG bag. I’m 6 foot, 170 lb and it works fine for me but I can see it sure wouldn’t work for everyone.

    Rob
     
  15. Vansen

    Vansen Gear Master (retiring)

    Staff Member Friend
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    2,294
    Dislikes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Seattle
    Let’s talk about first aid kits for a moment. Everyone seems to carry one, and if you don’t, you should. There are plenty of off the shelf first aid kits that you can buy at anywhere from Walgreen’s to REI. In my opinion, each of these kits are filled with crap and are way too heavy. They also don’t have items that I consider critical. Because of this, I’ve created my own first aid kit that’s meant for international carry on travel and for hiking/ backpacking.

    Most of this kit can originally be attributed to Ray Jardine’s Trail Life book. I’ve added to his requirements a little bit to cover every day international and domestic travel - it goes in my toiletries bag, too.

    My total weight – 211g

    · Carrying bag
    · Ibuprofen (or equivalent)
    · Amoxicillin (or equivalent)
    · Pepto-Bismol (or equivalent)
    · Claritin-D (or equivalent)
    · Tweezers
    · Nitrile gloves
    · Alcohol pads, 5
    · Neosporin packs, 4
    · Iodine pods
    · Super glue (medical grades are available)
    · Gauze pads, 4
    · Medical tape, small roll
    · Band-Aid, extra-large, 2
    · Band-Aid, normal, 5
    · Band-Aid, medium-small, 2
    · Band-Aid, small, 5

    The most commonly used items in here are the ibuprofen, Claritin-D, and alcohol pads. Ibuprofen is self-explanatory. The Claritin-D is often quickly used up by friends as they discover new allergies when we travel to new places. The alcohol pads end up being used for repairing gear more than for first aid, usually in conjunction with Tenacious Tape.

    IMG_2237.jpg
     
  16. JustAnotherRando

    JustAnotherRando My other bike is a Ferrari

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2017
    Likes Received:
    895
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    My 'close to home' kit, for hiking and mountain biking, consists of:
    • A couple each of ibuprofen, acetominiphen, tramadol
    • Duct tape
    • Bug spray
    My 'travelling to civilised countries' sports medical kit expands to
    • Antihistamines
    • Gauze
    • Medical tape (the stuff that holds gauze on)
    • 3M Tegaderm
    • Antibacterial cream
    • Band Aids
    • Water purification tablets
    Duct tape is great stuff. In addition to fixing gear, it can be used to prevent blisters, to hold bandages in place, and to splint (fortunately I've only needed to splint once).

    I've looked into medical grade super glue as I used to tear myself up mountain biking on a regular basis, but it was very expensive, and I figured it was better to bleed and clean the wounds rather than seal them up with crap embedded in my flesh.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018

Share This Page