None of the above - Any cyclists?

Discussion in 'Cars, Motorcycles, Boats, Airplanes Talk' started by yotacowboy, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. pedalhead

    pedalhead Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Likes Received:
    2,174
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Oxfordshire, UK
    Definitely, every year! Bit tricky this year though as we're on holiday in California, a week of which will be in the mountains so it may be tricky to find coverage. Hopefully being in the States we'll get Phil & Paul back on the commentary. They were dropped from the UK coverage a couple of years ago.
     
    jowls likes this.
  2. jowls

    jowls Never shitposts (please) - Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Likes Received:
    4,076
    Dislikes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    43°S
    I haven’t watched the tour since...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now that I’m doing a bit of road riding again it has piqued my interest.

    Wait... someone other than Phil Liggett has been commentating the tour? Unpossible.
     
    hellwhynot and pedalhead like this.
  3. pedalhead

    pedalhead Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Likes Received:
    2,174
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Oxfordshire, UK
    haha yeah, ITV decided to use their own commentators (who, in fairness are fairly knowledgeable). Sean Kelly on Eurosport, on the other hand, just sounds utterly depressed all the time.
     
  4. Kernel Kurtz

    Kernel Kurtz Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    May 19, 2018
    Likes Received:
    679
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Been riding a GT hardtail for the last 15 years and have gotten great service out of it, but have decided it is time for something new and going to upgrade to a full suspension bike. No mountains around here, but lots of trails and since I retired I've been logging a lot of miles.

    Would probably stick with GT but they don't have a very good retail presence here anymore, so I've narrowed it down to probably a Trek Fuel EX5 or a Cannondale Habit 4. The Trek is a bit under 3K CDN and the Habit a bit over, but that is pretty much my budget range. Also considered the Specialized Epic, but not sure if I love that whole Brain suspension thing, I hear it is high maintenance. After some thought I also think I am going to go 27.5 rather than 29er.

    Anyone have any thoughts or experience with any of these? They all feel different, but good in any case, so it is a tough choice. Whatever I choose is going to be my regular ride for a long time to come - I'm the same with bikes as with stereos, I usually buy something I like and stick with it. I have too many hobbies to be changing up the hardware regularly.
     
  5. lac29

    lac29 Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Likes Received:
    48
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Changeling likes this.
  6. ohmaigulay

    ohmaigulay Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    151
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    California
    Hey everyone!

    Looking into getting a road bike.

    I was wondering about people’s experiences between aluminum alloy Vs carbon composite frames of similar geometry.

    Is the price difference worth it between something like a Canyon Endurace AL vs Endurace CF? Allez Vs Robauix? Contend Vs Defy? That sort of thing.
     
  7. ald0s

    ald0s Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Likes Received:
    98
    Dislikes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Carbon will generally be lighter and give a more pliable ride as its more forgiving to rode vibration. Personally I don't the feel of carbon bikes and ride steel or titanium, however there aren't many affordable frames made in these materials.

    My other issues with carbon are that the frames are pretty much non recyclable and if you have a semi decent crash on a road bike pretty much have to be binned.

    The lions share of people prefer the benefits of carbon (affordable / comfy / light).
     
    ohmaigulay likes this.
  8. pedalhead

    pedalhead Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Likes Received:
    2,174
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Oxfordshire, UK
    From the bikes you're looking at, I'm guessing you're interested in a bike with a fairly comfortable geometry & ride. Imho, if the choice is between alu and carbon, you're more likely to get the comfort from a carbon frame. Whilst alu frames are generally a lot less harsh than they used to be, there are some really great carbon frames out there with layups that are extremely stiff laterally and very compliant vertically. Most of the bike manufacturers have nailed this I think.

    Having said that, as you've noticed, you're going to pay a premium for carbon over alu. There are other ways to get some compliance...eg...wider & lower pressure tyres (especially tubeless), 27.2mm seat post (particularly with a downward sloping top tube).

    Personally, I feel that different materials are suitable for different applications. Eg, my race bikes (road and MTB) are carbon, but for ultra distance self supported riding & racing I stick to titanium for both road and MTB, which avoids too much of a weight penalty but generally takes the knocks better. Although, I should add that I've broken two titanium frames and one alu, never a carbon. Go figure :)
     
    ohmaigulay likes this.
  9. ergopower

    ergopower Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Likes Received:
    340
    Dislikes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    South Central PA
    Here is my experience. I have just retired a carbon Specialized Roubaix and currently ride a carbon Cervelo R3 SL (in between the current R3 & R5) and a cheapo aluminum 'cross frame, all with very similar geometry. I have used the exact same set of wheels/tires/tubes on all 3.

    The Roubaix is maybe very slightly more comfortable than the alu 'cross frame, really not much in it. The carbon R3 SL is noticeably stiffer in the front end than either, good for steering feel, but I feel it more in my hands & shoulders. This I think is because the lower headset bearing is 1 3/8" where the other 2 are 1 1/8".

    Bottom line, I'd look at what else you give up with the lower-tier frame, components & wheelset. The Allez is same geometry as the Tarmac, it looks like they don't make an aluminum Roubaix anymore. So if you weren't after a race geometry frame, there might not be an alu Specialized to consider. The Canyons look identical except frame and you save $500. I'd be very tempted to pocket the $500. Giant bikes are a headscratcher - for same Shimano 105 group & wheelset, it's $1,000 difference. Unless I'm missing something, the alu is a no-brainer.

    I (attempt) to ride with guys that are Cat 3s & 4s, and a few of them are on Cannondales; all of them chose alu 'cross bikes over carbon and one guy is road racing an alu CAAD 12. He previously had a carbon Ridley, he likes the CAAD just as well, and fewer tears when you bin it.
     
    ohmaigulay likes this.
  10. ohmaigulay

    ohmaigulay Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    151
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    California
    I'll have to try to distinguish the feel of a carbon and aluminum when I test ride bicycles. I have a steel framed Jamis Coda hybrid with carbon fork and 32mm tires for 5 yrs now. It's a very comfortable bike. In hindsight maybe I should have gotten the very similar steel framed Jamis Quest road bike instead. Now I want try a full road bicycle that feels more zippier that I can go for longer rides on but still able to commute daily to work. My area is hilly as well, another factor I'd need to consider.

    There's a bike store nearby that sells Sabbath Titanium frames that are priced lower than other brands. But checking their website recently it seems they stopped carrying them. Always been curious about the mythical titanium ride, I don't think I can stomach the cost.

    I wouldn't want a full race frame as I'd also use the bike for my short commute to work. I've read that a full Shimano 105 group is a good solid mix of quality and value. The Canyons are the ones tempting me the most since from what I can tell they offer the most for the price. I'll have to make the trip to Carlsbad to see their showroom. There's another company called Rose Bikes that also have well rated aluminum and carbon entry level bikes. Unlike Canyon though, they don't have a US division yet and I'd have to order the bike from Germany.
     
  11. ergopower

    ergopower Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Likes Received:
    340
    Dislikes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    South Central PA
    Yeah, I wouldn't go lower than 105, I don't think Tiagra or below is as durable and doesn't have as nice a 'feel'. Canyon is getting great reviews for their design and value for money, I don't think you can go wrong. It's not hard to finish the assembly required, but maybe the Carlsbad showroom offers completely-built bikes?
    The biggest thing you're going to notice is down to the tires, tubes and air pressure. 32mm tires should be like a pillow, but can feel a bit sluggish. With the money you save on alu, get good tires. In my experience, the best combination of feel, durability and rolling resistance are Vittoria Corsa. The latest are Corsa Speed, which I haven't tried. The non-Speed version I sometimes see on sale for $30 - $35. I ride 25mm with latex tubes. You can also get them in 28mm which will give you some more isolation from rough surfaces but feel should be pretty close. Use Berto method for determining rear tire pressure, subtract about 5 - 7 psi for the front (Berto does not account for standing climbing, his front pressures are too low).
     
  12. ohmaigulay

    ohmaigulay Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    151
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    California
    BFE352F2-7FED-47EA-9D61-7425ECED46EC.jpeg 4BF375DD-0E4B-416A-9F78-C35AC91AF976.jpeg 409ECBDE-D020-49C6-B340-B4D493E65FAE.jpeg

    I was able to visit the Canyon showroom in Carlsbad earlier. It was a great experience. Staff were friendly and accommodating and set me up with an Endurace demo bike my size after going through their Perfect Fit measurement system.

    They had some winning pro bikes on display as well.

    They didn’t have an aluminum Endurace for demo and the carbon one I rode was an uptier model with Ultegra components.

    For those planning on visiting, you need a helmet, driver’s license, and credit card to take the bikes out for a ride. They let you have an hour to ride and the showroom is right next to Pacific Coast Highway with dedicated bike lane. Riding up and down the rolling coast I was really impressed with the ride and handling of the carbon Endurace. You cross railroad tracks on the way to PCH and it rode over the rails just fine. I didn’t notice any flex on the frame.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
    pedalhead likes this.
  13. ohmaigulay

    ohmaigulay Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    151
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    33
    Location:
    California
    I asked the showroom and I’d still have to order the bike online and have it shipped to my home. Howerver if I’m welcome to bring the bike to the showroom if I’m having trouble with assembly, which they said was simple, and they can finish it there.

    Interesting I never thought to keep the front tire pressures lower than the rear. I will try this on my current bike. I did see quite a few of the more racing oriented Canyon bikes had Vittoria Corsas. An Aeroad for demo had the 25mm ones. My current tires are Vittoria Randonneurs. I think they’re more for durability and touring.
     
  14. jpoyarzun

    jpoyarzun Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    May 14, 2018
    Likes Received:
    81
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Santiago de Chile
    I'm not a cyclist (for sport) but i love to ride bikes (for leisure and commuting)...

    My all time ride is a "postmodern bike" using an 80's frame from a local legend (Chile) called Samuel del Valle... He died in 2012 but he was recognized by E. Colnago as the finest frame artisan of all time. In fact in the 70s and 80s he built lot of frames for riders of the Giro de Italia who then rebranded their frames to cinelli, colnago or whatever the sponsor of their team... The steel is reynolds 531, was restored and repainted by a local artist, and everything else is from 2017-18 (carbon, modern shimano, brooks cambium, veloflex kevlar tyres...). I pursued this frame for like 4 or 6 years, nowadays having a frame from this guy is super hard so allow me to post a few pics of my pride and joy :) .

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. insidious meme

    insidious meme Ambivalent Kumquat

    Friend
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2015
    Likes Received:
    3,666
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Sector 8023 of the Third Quadrant
    I haven't been on my bike in ages. Actually took it out yesterday just to feel what it was like to be on a bike again. Uh, that didn't last too long. Will try again next weekend.
     
    crazychile, pedalhead and JK47 like this.
  16. StandUp713

    StandUp713 Acquaintance

    Contributor
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2016
    Likes Received:
    90
    Dislikes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    San Pedro CA
    Seems like all the cool kids have disk brakes now.
     
    bengo likes this.
  17. bengo

    bengo Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2017
    Likes Received:
    1,354
    Dislikes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Divisive Kingdom
    Home Page:
    Yes, and they're a PITA to adjust properly (assuming you prefer to do such things yourself).
     
  18. ergopower

    ergopower Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2018
    Likes Received:
    340
    Dislikes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    South Central PA
    Depends a lot on the disk brakes. Assuming you're starting with rotors than run true, most hydraulic systems are self-adjusting. Some cable-actuated are a pain, some (like Avid) have adjusting wheels on either side of the caliper that make it pretty easy.
     
  19. pedalhead

    pedalhead Friend

    Friend
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Likes Received:
    2,174
    Dislikes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Oxfordshire, UK
    Yeah, also, bolt through axles help with consistent rotor alignment. Road/CX/gravel bikes are clearly heading in this direction now, a good thing imho.

    Good stuff! It gets easier every time (especially if you can have a ride at least a couple of times a week).
     
  20. crazychile

    crazychile Eastern Iowa's Spiciest Pepper

    Friend BWC
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Likes Received:
    1,740
    Dislikes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Grant Woods backyard
    In my twenties I used to ride at least 100 miles a week. Now in my 50's, I'm lucky to do 50 a year. I'd like a new cruiser bike for comfort, maybe a 3 speed with aluminum frame...but if I'm honest with myself it would probably just sit and gather dust after a few rides. This year I took my 25 yr old Cannondale mountain bike and put a springy Brooks saddle on it and some street tires. It still doesn't have quite the comfort geometry I'm looking for but it's a lot closer to a casual daily rider than it was before.
     

Share This Page