Raspberry Pi troubleshooting and configuration instructions for complete fucking morons

Discussion in 'Computer Audiophile: Software, Configs, Tools' started by rhythmdevils, Dec 7, 2021.

  1. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    [​IMG]

    The Raspberry Pi (RPi) is the mini computer used in the Pi2AES and other streamers. There are often a lot of issues with configuring the RPi with various software and troubleshooting problems that come up with the software or network issues. So far these questions get dumped in the Pi2AES thread (I'm very guilty of this) but it really has nothing to do with the Pi2AES, which is a module for outputting audio out of the RPi.

    So this thread is going to hopefully serve as a troubleshootign help thread for UPNP issues, RPi issues, software setup issues, and network issues.

    I'm going to include guides to setup each of the popular programs to run on the Pi2AES in the beginning, which I will need someone with experience to write for me. so pm me if you have this knowledge and can write up a setup guide that is very simple and designed for people with zero tech knowledge. and I will add it to this thread.

    Then the rest will be open to help and questions.

    Advice on choosing which software

    Moode

    Volumio

    Ropiee
    • Recommend if you are using Roon
     
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    Last edited: Dec 7, 2021
  2. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    Moode configuration instructions for complete fucking morons
     
  3. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    Volumio configuration instructions for complete fucking morons
     
  4. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    Last edited: Feb 10, 2022
  5. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    PiCore configuration instructions for complete fucking morons
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2022
  6. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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  7. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    I'll start this off with a troubleshooting question for one of my Pi2AES.

    My speakers Pi2AES just stopped working all of a sudden, And it was the more dependable Pi2AES, not needing a reset much at all unlike my headphones Pi2AES.

    Rebooting didn't help, so I re-flashed Moode from a fresh download. None of the generic IP addresses showed up. For some reason you all get a nice RPI symbol in Fing, I do not I just get a bunch of generic IP addresses and have to try to load each one until Moode loads with one of them

    so none of them loaded Moode. I re flashed the card again, none of them loaded Moode.

    I reflashed it a third time, and none of them loaded Moode.

    then I tried flashing Ropiee. None of the IP addresses loaded.

    then I reset my router, bought new SD cards and flashed Moode onto it.

    None of the IP addresses load.

    I'm at a loss at this point.
     
  8. rlow

    rlow A happy woofer

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    Did you try checking the power yet?
     
  9. daduy

    daduy Rando

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    Can you plug them into monitor?
     
  10. Woland

    Woland Friend

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    Hi @rhythmdevils I really like the intention of this.. just wanted to add a few suggestions. They're based around the idea you want reusable tips and community involvement rather than a sequence of one-off troubleshooting exchanges.

    First, almost everything you wrote about Pi2AES is valid for a whole range of other audio HATs for Raspberry Pi. Since the Pi2AES uses common settings, most of the setup will be identical and should probably be covered in the same place and mentioned in the description to cultivate participation. There are differences, but they are unlikely to be a sticking point for the target audience.

    Second, unfortunately there may be significant differences in instructions depending on which Raspberry Pi (or other Single Board Computer) you use.

    You might consider breaking the instructions into two parts.

    Part A to setup the Pi and its software for USB output (download appropriate software, burn it to media, configure network, music library etc). You'll get the basics working, and in my experience, that might be enough. USB is a great option for Mobius and likely other DACs - no HAT is required.

    Part B to configure the audio HAT and output. Part B will actually be almost automatic for some setups where the hardware identifies itself and the software auto configures, like HiFiBerry HATs on Ropieee. At the other extreme, it'll be much more fiddly for other situations like using I2S.

    Third, I'd suggest you provide some guidance on choosing from the bewildering range of software options available. An easy example - if someone already uses Roon they should use Ropieee.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 8, 2021
  11. Michael Kelly

    Michael Kelly MOT: Pi 2 Design

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    One minor note - I2S from the PI2AES has no different setup than any other output from the PI2AES. Once the PI2AES is running, all outputs, including I2S, are on automatically.
     
  12. rhythmdevils

    rhythmdevils MOT: rhythmdevils audio

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    I don't even know enough about this to understand most of your advice. But I did add a part in the first post for advice on which software to choose.

    I will need the help of experienced, knowledge people here to turn this into a useful thread but I'm hoping with time, people will write setup guides for each program. that would make the Pi2AES much more accessible to everyone and avoid a lot of repetitive questions.

    So if you have a minute, and know one of these programs, write up a VERY BASIC setup guide. In layman's terms. ie. click here, check this, copy this, turn on this here, etc. I'll give you credit for writing it, with your @username at the top ;)

    thank you!
     
  13. Cspirou

    Cspirou They call me Sparky

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  14. Woland

    Woland Friend

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    Yes, however the rest of the i2s system setup gets fiddly for some..!

     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2021
  15. Woland

    Woland Friend

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    So you want to use a Raspberry Pi to send audio to your DAC. The first thing you should know is that because a Pi is a computer, and because your DAC has multiple inputs, there are many, many ways to make it work. Aside from the connections, there are options about extra audio hardware and the software you use and how it is configured. You may also need to consider backing up the software occasionally. You should expect to encounter the same sort of problems you encounter with any other computer, like its behavior unexpectedly changing or it providing a security vulnerability in your home computer network. There are plenty of other audio options that don't have these drawbacks, so be sure this is the path you want to follow.


    Before getting into any specific setup, here are some things to figure out because they'll influence your setup:

    * Where will the music be stored? Will it be on the Pi, elsewhere on your home network, or streamed from the cloud (Tidal Spotify etc)

    * How will the music be controlled? Will it be by your phone, via a remote control, via a screen on the Pi itself? You can have one or multiple of these.

    * Will the Pi be connected to the network via WiFi, an ethernet cable, or not at all?

    * How will you connect to your DAC? If possible, start with USB as the setup is simplest. Most other connection types require an expansion HArdware on Top (HAT) audio board as well as appropriate cables.


    If you don't already have a Pi, you should know that there are a lot of different models. Older Pi's and Pi Zero (original) make setup harder and won't be discussed here. Here are the 3 main options:

    Pi Zero 2 W. This is a great and inexpensive option if you want to connect to your DAC via USB. It's new and is likely to work with all mainstream software, however that's not confirmed. You'll need a Micro USB OTG cable to make the connection work. If you want to use an Audio board on top (HAT), you'll need the 'H' variation of the Pi with expansion pins. You'll also need an adapter if you want HDMI video output, and a hub if you want to attach a keyboard or USB drive in addition to your USB DAC.

    Pi 3 This is a full size Pi with 4 USB ports, full sized HDMI, a slot for a display connector and header pins for an expansion audio board on top (HAT).

    Pi 4 This is the top of the line model, a slightly more powerful full size Pi with 4 USB ports including high speed ports good for USB drives. It needs an adapter for HDMI cables, and can connect a local display. It's available in different memory sizes -- for almost all users, the most basic memory should be totally sufficient.

    All these Pi's require a memory card for their software. Traditionally, a micro SD card has been used. Some Pi's can be booted from USB drives which are generally faster and cheaper.

    All of these Pi's are sold as raw boards. You'll also want a power supply and likely a case. Pi Zero's don't require much power, but Pi3's and 4's can have problems working reliably from regular USB power supplies like phone chargers, power boards and computer USB. Aside from reliability, some people claim the type of USB power supply has an impact on the audio output.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 10, 2021
  16. LetMeBeFrank

    LetMeBeFrank Won't tell anyone my name is actually Francis

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    I'd like to add that Pi3's Ethernet is controlled by the USB chipset, limiting the total combined bandwidth to 300Mbps, so if you (like me) have a USB hard drive connected to the pi and are transferring files to it over Ethernet, you will be bottlenecked to about 150Mbp, or about 18MB/s, but due to overhead I usually only get 11-12MB/s. For comparison this same drive connected to my PC gets about 150MB/s.

    Pi4 does not have this limitation. It has Gigabit ethernet (1000Mbps) and USB 3.0 (limited to 4000Mbps)

    Since this thread is for "complete fucking morons":

    Mb is megabit, or 1000 bits.
    MB is megabyte, or 8000 bits

    Your internet is usually measured in bits and your computer files are usually measured in bytes.
     
  17. Cspirou

    Cspirou They call me Sparky

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    @LetMeBeFrank - While the ethernet limitations are true, I also don't think it's a bottleneck for dedicated music streaming.

    @Woland - You didn't mention the RPi A boards, which are perfectly fine for streaming

    One other thing to consider with the Pi4 is that the manufacturers have admitted that it runs rather hot and now sell an official case with a fan. If you are looking for a passively cooled compact system, you might want to forego the unnecessary power of the RPi4 and just stick with the RPi3 or the newer RPi zero.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2021
  18. LetMeBeFrank

    LetMeBeFrank Won't tell anyone my name is actually Francis

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    True, the bandwidth of the Ethernet/USB is way more than enough for streaming. I just wanted to mention a technical limitation I encountered with my storage hooked up directly.
     
  19. Michael Kelly

    Michael Kelly MOT: Pi 2 Design

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    They do mention the possibility of getting hot, but remember they are talking about a wide range of applications including multimedia and GPU usage. For an audio streamer it gets warm, but not overly so. And there are well documented tweaks to reduce it even further when using it for audio streaming.
     
  20. Woland

    Woland Friend

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    Here's a very basic pi streamer. It works really well for a DAC that has good USB connectivity (eg Unison USB)

    The green board is a Pi Zero W H. The W means it supports WiFi. The H 'header' pins sticking up can be used for expansion, such as an audio board.
    The case is from C4Labs
    There's an SD card inserted on the left, loaded with Moode software
    The left cable is a USB OTG cable. This specific cable outputs to micro USB, suitable for my Schiit Modi 3. Depending on your DAC's USB socket, you may want a different output connection. Only the Zero needs the OTG cable, the larger Pis have regular USB sockets and use regular USB cables.
    The right cable is a regular USB cable for power.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2021

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