Fuji XT2 XT20 questions and advice?

Discussion in 'Photography and Cameras' started by purr1n, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. Greg121986

    Greg121986 Almost "Made"

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    I had a FujiFilm XT10 for a few weeks but I returned it because it had some aberration in the lens. I ended up getting a Sony a6000 because my buddy has one and we share lenses. I really wish I still had the Fuji, though. It was fantastic. I loved the manual dial controls and the vibrant colors. I have taken some fantastic pictures with my Sony, but after seeing this thread I am lusting for a Fuji again. This was all about 3 years ago, so maybe it's time for an upgrade.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
  2. purr1n

    purr1n Burned out

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    Haven't had issues with dust, although I don't switch lenses in the field. I pick what I want and mount before heading out. I can confirm that the T20 doesn't have issues in light / moderate rain. I'm glad I got the smaller T20. Had I gotten the larger T2, I would have never taken it out.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
  3. cooperpwc

    cooperpwc Friend

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    No doubt this is true. I was on vacation in Thailand last week and took my camera out with me on far too few days - really just on the day that we rented a car. Which is too bad because I enjoyed using it when I did.

    A Fuji camera + lens that is small, has excellent optics and is weather sealed. Too much to ask for?
     
  4. JustAnotherRando

    JustAnotherRando My other bike is a Ferrari

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    They do two of the three, and I think weather sealing is a non-issue for all but very specific pro usage.

    Been using non-sealed cameras for decades in inclement weather (including Asian typhoons and typical miserable Scottish weather) with rudimentary protection (plastic shopping bags and common sense) and it's never been a problem.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2018
  5. zerodeefex

    zerodeefex SBAF's Imelda Marcos

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    This is why I picked up the rx1r ii. I take it everywhere due to size/convenience.
     
  6. DigMe

    DigMe Needs a baby bottle

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    Really been enjoying my XT-2 lately. Finally got a really good lens for it (the Fuji 16-55 f2.8) and I’m loving that. I was really missing the pro quality lenses when I sold off all my Nikon gear. There was definitely a learning curve for me in switching systems but I feel like I’ve got it all down and I’m making photos on par with my previous system.
     
  7. Syzygy

    Syzygy Friend

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    I'd been using an X100F exclusively for quite awhile, but bought an X-T3 with the 16mm f1.4 on release. Haven't yet had enough time to fully enjoy it, but yeah I really like the physical controls. I bought a couple of adapters and have gotten some great shots with my F-mount Tamron 90mm macro, and an old Sigma F-mount zoom. Of course they're manual focus, but I'm not shooting action.

    I still have a Nikon N6006 in a baggie in an old camera bag stored. I'd sold a 4x5 just before I bought into the Fuji system with the X-Pro1, which was sold. Just this week I thought about getting an old Speed Graphic, but I'm not sure I want to deal with film again. Although I still have some Fujifilm Velvia 100 4x5 in my wine fridge.
     
  8. Questhate

    Questhate Friend

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    Big Fuji lens sale going on right now (at all the usual outlets) if anyone is interested.

    Arguably their two best primes:
    16 / 1.4
    56 / 1.2

    Also their red badge prosumer zooms:
    8-16 / 2.8
    16-55 / 2.8
    50-140 / 2.8

    There are a few others as well (80mm macro, 100-400, 10-24), so best check it out:https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/sear..._3442|fujifilm-x-mount&setView=GRID&view=GRID

    Probably best to buy it from Adorama since they throw in a bunch of accessory junk for free.
     
  9. abisai2

    abisai2 Friend

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    @DigMe Would you mind elaborating a little bit? I'm contemplating downsizing from my Nikon D7000 and associated lenses. I'm considering the Fuji X-T20 as well.
     
  10. purr1n

    purr1n Burned out

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    Different flow. You let ISO float and turn the physical aperture ring on the lens and set shutter speed dial accordingly. At least that's what I do. Think of it as M mode, but ISO adjusts magically. Of course care will be needed to avoid the limits (underexposure and overexposure) because the ISO can only adjust so much.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019
  11. Questhate

    Questhate Friend

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    I'm not DigMe, but I imagine the learning curve is in the ergonomics. If you're using a system so much that the dials/controls/buttons/menus are second nature, you'll just need to "re-wire" yourself.
     
  12. Questhate

    Questhate Friend

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    Also, @abisai2... If you're looking into an X-T20, just a heads up that the X-T30 is just around the corner (to be released in Q1). You may want to wait for the latest, or take advantage of the X-T20 going on clearance.
     
  13. abisai2

    abisai2 Friend

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    Ok, I think I get it. So if I understand correctly I allow the camera to manage ISO settings using one of the three auto modes available. Then I adjust my shutter/aperture as needed based on the shot I'm trying to get.

    I guess the lack of a viewfinder is something to get used for sure. I haven't used my D7000 in a long time so the learning curve may not be as steep. If I was using it all the time I can see how the change can be an issue.
     
  14. abisai2

    abisai2 Friend

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    @Questhate Thanks for the heads up. I plan on looking at the Fuji over the next days. If I can rent one locally I might consider that as well.
     
  15. DigMe

    DigMe Needs a baby bottle

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    Just everything the Nikon was an extension of me. I shot hubdreds of thousands of frames on Nikon and the Fuji was not a Nikon so it took adjustment in terms of how the meter interprets scenes, control adjustment and placement, focusing (was using Nikon pro lenses before ao it was faster and the focus point is much larger on fuji). Having had a portrait photography business sharp eye focus is crucial for me and most of the time if an eye is not Razer sharp zoomed in then the photo will not see light of day and I’m typically very good at making sure my photos are sharp. The Fuji has an eye detect but it wasn’t always landing where I wanted it too and doing some event photography it would sometimes find the wrong person’s eye so I typically have it off if I’m not doing posed portraits. The focus was the thing I wrestled with most just knowing exactly what settings and whatnot would result in sharp photos vs Nikon. It’s not that the Fuji has bad focus but it’s just different like I said.

    I don’t work my exposure like Marv does unless I’m just doing really casual outdoor shots. This was another thing about the Fuji vs Nikon. I mostly shot all manual on the Nikon adjusting exactly which setting I wanted without removing it from my eye. Typically I know what aperture I want to shoot in so I do not like that being my primary point of adjustment. It’s usually shutter speed and ISO that I want to adjust. It’s not ideal on Fuji but I’ve gotten quick enough with it.

    Getting a pro lens helped me few a lot better on it since they have the reliability that I’m used to. I’ll post more thoughts if I think of them. Gotta go now.
     
  16. abisai2

    abisai2 Friend

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    @DigMe Thank you for the detailed reply. This provides additional perspective I wasn't thinking about. It reminds me of my time learning to adjust to a D7000 coming from a D80 that had a tendency to overexpose everything.
     
  17. purr1n

    purr1n Burned out

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    The Fuji's exposure isn't anywhere as good as Nikon's, there is a lot of EV compensation that I need to dial-in compared to Nikon. It's not a fast flow camera like Nikon. Changing the focus point is clumsy, although you can do this with a touch on the viewscreen (like on phones), I tend to use the viewfinder by habit, so no go there. Think of it as a 21st century equivalent of yesteryear's Canon AE-1. I'd take Nikon or Canon over the Fuji for candid wedding photos any day.

    The XT20 has the digital viewfinder. Resolution and refresh and good. Small size sucks. I'd rather take a FF SLR viewfinder. I limit the auto ISO so it won't go too high resulting in too much noise. However, the noise grain is awesome and can be used for an artistic / film-like effect. Crank up the ISO and set into the Acros B&W simulation with a color filter, and you can get some pretty neat results.

    Here's an ISO4000 OOC. Barry's in murder kill mood.
    DSCF0142.JPG
     
  18. abisai2

    abisai2 Friend

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    @purr1n That's a pretty awesome shot IMO. Thank you for the feedback as well.
     
  19. DigMe

    DigMe Needs a baby bottle

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    One thing that’s really great about the Fuji as with many mirrorless cameras is the manual focus. I also use the viewfinder and when you adjust the focus manually I have it set to auto zoom in so you can check focus. I love that feature.
     
  20. Syzygy

    Syzygy Friend

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    I have the X-T3 instead of the 20, which has the newer chip and sensor. Autofocus and eye detect is perfect, even for running subjects. I'd actually prefer a viewfinder style, but the X-Pro2 is too far behind in its tech. Maybe when I'm rich I can get the GFX50R, haha. (of course those aren't for any kind of action)

    I used to shoot Nikon from boyhood, and it does take a bit to get used to the different controls, especially if you never used a film camera with manual controls. Thankfully, the Fujis all allow you to customise the buttons how you want.

    I often shoot aperture priority, and I set the exposure comp dial to "C" so I can use the front dial to get ±6 stops of comp in 1/3 stop increments. So yeah, manually adjust the aperture ring, set comp if you need it, focus and shoot. I don't usually move the focus point around much. For me, it's much faster to put the focus window over the correct place, half press, and recompose. Got used to it during film days.

    Another nice thing is that you can see both the film simulation and the actual image in the finder (or the back) during composition, so you can see before you shoot what it's gonna look like.

    And yeah, I love the Acros simulation. But don't add grain to it…there's grain in that simulation itself.

    @abisai2 I'd wait until the X-T30 is released so you can make a smart choice about whether you'd rather have it or the X-T20. Its specs aren't known yet. But Fuji will typically use the same chip & sensor in the entire range of a generation of cameras, so it may have the new chip & sensor. Either way, the market's likely to get flooded with cheap X-T20's shortly thereafter.

    The last thing is about development…Lightroom is known to sometimes have issues with Fuji raw files, producing worm-like artifacts in certain cases. There are workarounds (e.g., using Iridient DNG Converter to convert it to DNG first), but be aware. I use Capture 1, which has always done fantastic with the Fuji files. Iridient Developer is another that is highly praised for Fuji.
     

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