The Motorcycle Thread

Discussion in 'Cars, Motorcycles, Boats, Airplanes Talk' started by OJneg, Feb 12, 2016.

  1. winders

    winders Know-it-all boomer, prob racist

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    Me when I was a little more crazy than I am now:

    racing.jpg
     
  2. captkirk

    captkirk Khan's BFF

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    Back to work today and the first message from a co-worker pops this up. - https://goo.gl/GVxvup

    2.5ltr turbo-powered boxer from WRX with hub-centric steering. Uh...yes please!

    [​IMG]

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  3. Senorx12562

    Senorx12562 Case of the mondays

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    An old friend that I miss a lot.

    HPIM1333.JPG
     
  4. TwoEars

    TwoEars Friend

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    @Senorx12562

    Those carburated kawa engines are awesome, so much power and so smooth. Sometimes they don't like wet and cold weather but it's worth it.
     
  5. Senorx12562

    Senorx12562 Case of the mondays

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    Tons o' grunt. The pod air fliters/airbox deletion along with much farting around with jetting and dyno runs had it pretty much spot on. It was about 124 hp-93lb/ft. at altitude. Forks and shocks were resprung and revalved, but it still was a bit of a flexible flyer, especially the swingarm. I wasn't racing the thing though. If I had kept it, I would've braced the swingarm and found a different seat or redone the stock pan; the seat was horrible. It is a 2003 (only year for the blue, my fave). Had about 30k on it when I sold it. As I said, I miss it.
     
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  6. WhiteNoise

    WhiteNoise Facebook Friend

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    I figure at this point you do not need advice but I'll chime in since this is the official motorcycle thread.

    Been riding damn near 40 years now with just about 28 years on street. I have owned around 14 bikes and currently ride a HD FXSTC

    But here is a shot of me up on Palomar Mtn here in so cal back when I had my ZX7R (which I regret selling)

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    This one I have blown up and framed in my garage:
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    And here is my current bike. Bought it in 2012 (it is an 08) I have put way too much money into this bike.
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  7. StanT

    StanT Acquaintance

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    Take an MSF class, buy used, and keep in mind that the first bike you buy will not be the one you drive long term. Much like audio, no one gets it right with their first purchase. You need to drive one for a while before you know what you really want.


    Yours truly on my 2012 BMW R1200RT. I've owned a Honda Valkyrie, like HD; but I live in the mountains, am getting old(er), and don't want to deal with 900# motorcycles any longer.


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  8. Nortonguy

    Nortonguy Rando

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    Came here from the ADV site, still catching up on some interesting threads. Doesn't look like there has been a lot of action here so I'll add my .02 worth.

    This was a barn find I took a chance on only because it had been sitting for 20 years or so and this guy was the original owner. It was on Craigs list for 6 months or so for WAY too much money, I finally called and it was the right day to make a deal. He said come over and have a look and we'll get it done.
    Needed some tidying up etc and in the end it shaped up pretty well.


    [​IMG]

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  9. ergopower

    ergopower Friend

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    I need to move on from a Bandit 1250S. I bought it because a local guy was selling it super cheap, but I haven't been riding it because I just find it too big/heavy and the riding position a little too sporting.

    As a nerd, I'm really interested in the new bikes that have an IMU, but that pretty much eliminates the used bike market. Any of you guys rocking an IMU? Do you find it makes a noticeable difference, or is it one of those things that is technically marvelous but doesn't really ever come into play?

    If I forego the tech, I'd probably just look for a nice used Versys 650LT; that seems to have the riding position I'm looking for, decent suspension and brakes, and enough grunt for me riding one up. Definitely want street-oriented 17/17, there's very little around here where 21/18 would be of use.
     
  10. scblock

    scblock Friend

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    It sounds like it might be a little out of the price and size market you're looking for, but I find the BMW adventure bikes (F850 GS, R1250 GS) very comfortable and easy to ride. The riding position is fairly upright and wind protection is relatively good. I don't know for sure about the tech, my R1200 GS Adventure has the TFT screen and it measures acceleration and lean angle and records it to the companion app on my phone, along with marking points where ABS or ASC activated, but I don't know whether that's what you're referring to with the IMU.

    But the BMW bikes are huge, and heavy. I don't really notice the weight while riding on the road - it's actually easier to control and feels lighter on the controls than my little SV650 - but I wouldn't want to have to pick it up by myself. And I keep the seat in the higher position because I like more distance to the pegs, but I'm on tiptoes at stoplights (5' 11").

    I also spent some time on a Suzuki V-Strom 650 a few years back and found it to be a nice ride as well. It seemed aimed at a similar feel with similar riding position as the BMWs, but far less expensive. Like the BMW it was a little tall at stoplights. I really like the Suzuki 650 motor. I'm not light and the 650 motor has plenty of gruntunless you're all about that Go Fast riding. I know the Versys is aimed at a similar market, but I don't have direct experience with the bike.

    Even if you decide against a newer bike with all the technology, I do recommend a bike with ABS if possible, and traction control is nice too.
     
  11. beemerphile

    beemerphile Friend

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    IMU's are great a great Plan B or C, but some minimally trained people use it as an excuse to avoid learning how to control the motorcycle in three dimensions. Untrained riders will instinctively grab brake while leaned over in a turn that they went in too hot on if they were beginning to run wide. They are usually running wide because they are emotionally unable to lean deeper (even though they have traction and cornering clearance left) and apply a bit of throttle to raise the suspension and give the front wheel some additional traction for steering (trading rear traction for front traction). Regardless of any electronic wizardry employed, braking while leaned over reduces cornering clearance because it compresses the suspension. If the rear slides a bit because of the power, it tightens the turn. If the front wheel slides it widens the turn. Get both ends loose and you are drifting. You can train to the point that you are comfortable with both ends getting loose and steering with the throttle. Then you be really bad.

    Of course, I am an old fart who feels the same way about ABS. I just stripped it off of a BMW K1100.
     
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  12. scblock

    scblock Friend

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    I respect this position but now that I have ABS I don't think I'd buy a non-vintage bike without it. But then I've had a lowside from Too Much Front Brake in an emergency stop before (more than a decade ago now) and ABS would have save me about $2000 on the bike and another $500 in riding gear. To each his own.

    Absolutely agree on not relying on the computers.
     

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